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City Guide Dubi and surroundings



Area

Categories

Intended for


Area

Categories

Area

Categories

Area

Categories

Area

Categories

GPS:
50°44'55.32"N, 13°43'50.78"E

Points of interest: Nature

Intended for: Family, Able-bodied tourist, school groups

How: by car, cycling, on foot

Practical information:

Dubi map and surroundings

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Kahleberg – Stone Sea

Kahleberg – Stone Sea

Kahleberg – Stone SeaKahleberg – Stone SeaKahleberg – Stone SeaKahleberg – Stone SeaKahleberg – Stone Sea

Kahleberg (905 m) is the third highest mountain in the Eastern Ore Mountains and lies in Saxony not far from the border with the Czech Republic at the small town of Altenberg. Access routes lead from many rest stops along the motorways to Altenberg, as well as from the parking lots of the new Cínovec restaurant Krušnohorský Dvůr. These routes are well marked by wooden signposts and hiking symbols. At the peak of Kahleberg stands a small cottage and once you used to be able to look around from two towers. In good weather there is a beautiful view into Saxony as well as Bohemia from the mountain cottage. On the west are the highest peaks of the Ore Mountains: Klínovec (1244 m) and Fichtelberg (1214 m). On the North you can see the city of Dresden with its television tower and to the Northeast you can see all the way to the power plant in the Lusatian basin on the borders between Germany and Poland.
Toward the east you will spot the craggy basalt peak of Geisingberg (824 m) with a rock tower overlook against a backdrop of sandstone Děčínský Sněžník (723  m) and Königstein. Beyond a deep canyon of the Elbe lies the Czech-Saxon Switzerland region with the volcanic cones of Růžovský Vrch (619 m) and Klíč (759 m). In very good visibility the more than 100 km distant Ještěd (1012 m), the ridge of the Jizera Mountains, and the Giant Mountains, including their highest peak Sněžka (1602 m), are identifiable with the naked eye.
Kahleberg is formed of quartz-porphyry with slim veins of granite porphyry. This is a mineral typically with red coloration which you can spy on the south face of the mountain on the massive crags Small and Great Lugstein. These are beautiful overlooks not only of the Hochmoor nature preserve but also the Central Bohemian Uplands and the outlying parts of Prague. 
On the northwest slope of Kahleberg, however, the quartz-porphyry forms an vast stone sea (5 ha). Lichens grow here predominantly and the location is protected as a natural landmark. Local stone seas are the result of climactic and mechanical weathering in which water has leaked into rock cracks and fissures over the course of time. Here in the winter it freezes and expands until it melts again. The water carries off smaller particles into the valley (here they are either dumped or carried off by streams) and the piles of scree have remained. The continuous repeating of these processes in the end results in even the hardest cliffs being torn apart when their strong and dense mineral layers are first broken into larger blocks and then into ever smaller rocks.

Realizace - NOESIS